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« Signing Up for Credit Card Fraud Alerts Can Pay Off | Main | Warning: ‘Notification of Consumer Complaint’ Email Is a Scam »

Don't Fall for 'Do Not Call' Registry Scams

There are some Do Not Call Registry scams that you should be aware of, and they're being conducted via email and telephone.

Connecticut's Department of Consumer Protection (DCP) says hoax emails are being sent out to cell phone users claiming that the numbers they registered on the federal Do Not Call registries will soon be disclosed to telemarketers.

Some email messages, and even some unscrupulous telemarketers, have suggested that consumers call another hotline to register their numbers again. But that may be a scam to get your personal information.

In the email hoax, consumers are warned that telemarketing companies will soon be able to place sales calls to cell phones, and that consumers will be charged for such calls. However, the DCP wants consumers to know that there is no merit to such claims.

So you can rest assured knowing that your cell phone numbers will not go public, that your number will not be forwarded to telemarketers, and that telemarketers will not be able to call your cell phone penalty-free.

In fact, regardless of whether you placed your cell number on the Do Not Call Registry, it is a federal crime for telemarketers to call cell phones without the consumer's consent. So unless you specifically OK receiving telemarketing calls on your cell, you should not receive these annoying calls.

To further avoid falling for a Do Not Call scam, you should be aware that:

  • There is only one Do Not Call Registry, the federal registry operated by the Federal Trade Commission.
  • You can register both land lines and cell phone numbers on the registry. There are no separate registries.
  • There should never be a reason to have to reregister your number.
  • Once registered, telemarketers should stop calling within a month.
  • You may still receive marketing calls from nonprofit entities, companies you have done business with, and organizations whom you have given prior consent.

If you have a complaint about a potential violation of the Do Not Call Registry, or if you believe you have fallen victim to a scam, you can file a complaint with the FTC through its website, DoNotCall.gov.

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